Scotch-Irish-L Archives

Archiver > Scotch-Irish > 1998-02 > 0886356679


From: "Raymond W. Ryan Jr." <>
Subject: Re: Ornery
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 1998 13:11:19 -0500


One source says it is an adjective taken from old English 'ordinary' to
mean 'very ordinary', insignificant, or difficult to move by reason of
disposition. It is neither feminine nor masculine in its usage. Its usage
in this country has been tied in with those early settlers of the
Appalachian mountains. To attribute it to any particular nationality
group would be an effort in futility.

----------
> From: Denis Rogers <>
> To:
> Subject: Re: Ornery
> Date: Sunday, February 01, 1998 12:24 AM
>
> I must say that I agree with Iron Duke. It is perhaps an English Cockney
> word "Hornery" with the "H"
> being dropped, as they are wont to do. This would fit in with the
examples
> given--" A Hornery old coot", conveying the sense of a rather lovable
> rapscallion! Also "Hornery as a mule". Indeed the word conveys, I think,
not
> a down at the mouth attitude, but rather a debonair, if stubborn, pursuit
of
> ones aims. As an example two recent American Presidents, Kennedy and
> Clinton, both of them known to be 'ornery are usually pictured with happy
> expressions and wide grins. Regards, Denis.
>
> >
>
> I have to chime in with the fact that I have always seen the word spelled
> >"honery" and pronounced with a silent h.
> >
> >At 05:07 PM 1/30/98 -0800, you wrote:
> >>Dorothy Chance wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Does anyone have a notion whether the term "ornery" which is an old
mountain
> >>> saying might be derived from the language brought by the Scotch Irish
in the
> >>> 17th-18th century?
> >>>
> >>> I dont think I've ever heard the term applied to the female of the
species,
> >>> have you?
> >>> "he's an ornery cuss" has the "real" ring to it!!
> >>>
> >>> -----Original Message-----
> >>> From: Edward Andrews <>
> >>> To: <>
> >>> Cc: HettrickHill <>;

> >>> <>
> >>> Date: Friday, January 30, 1998 6:18 PM
> >>> Subject: Re: Ornery
> >>>
> >>> >Carl Backers wrote:
> >>> >> > Diane Hettrick
> >>> >> >
> >>> >> Hi, Since I am a Yank, I know what ornery is but please give me a
> >>> >> definition of "bloody minded". It sounds most descriptive! I am
all
> >>> >> ears.........
> >>> >> Connie Backers
> >>> > When used about someone whom you feel positively about, in the
> >>> >context of he's a right blood minded so and so, it can mean someone
> >>> >who is strong and forceful, who does not stand fools.
> >>> > The more common use, is that someone is being bloody minded if they
> >>> >unreasonably try to obstruct something, usually out of personal
pique.
> >>> >"He objected because he was being bloody minded"
> >>> > A bloody minded person can also be someone who is being a pain in
the
> >>> >but.
> >>> > I hope that this helps. Like ornery it has subtle meanings which
> >>> >depend on the context.
> >>> >Edward
> >>> >--
> >>> >St Nicholas Buccleuch Parish Church Dalkeith
> >>> >Visit our Web site
> >>> >http://www.btinternet.com/~stnicholas.buccleuch/index.htm
> >>> >
> >>Well, guys, let me tell you that ORNERY does not just apply to the
male
> >>gender. I have been called ORNERY by a few folks at different times in
> >>my life. Either that or "devilish". I cannot deny that. At least I
am
> >>not boring.
> >>Connie Backers
> >>
> >>
> >>
> > Joe in Austin
> >equitare arcum tendere et veritatem dicere
> >
> >
>
> ______________________________

This thread: