Scotch-Irish-L Archives

Archiver > Scotch-Irish > 1998-02 > 0886442130


From: "Raymond W. Ryan Jr." <>
Subject: Fw: Question
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 12:55:30 -0500


TO Connie LONG:

> First let us look at the surname Long. In the Middle Ages, particularly
in
> villages, there may have been four or five people called/named Roger.
One
> may have said,
> "Roger cut his hand." Response from another may have been, "Roger from
the
> dale?" The reply being, "No, Roger the long." Then, over time, Roger the
> long began to lose "the" resulting in Roger long. The capital letters
that
> we associate with surnames was a scribal convention added later on.
> Therefore Roger Long.
>
> Second, the name Richardson (son of Richard), in this country (1974
census), ranked as the 34th most common surname. It was very prelevant in
Massachusetts (ranked #15) in the 1790 census. (Most all leading names in
the 1790 census are
> British in origin which included Welsh, Scottish, and Irish. There were
> approximately 27,000 surnames in the 1790 census (taken from surviving
> records). Today there are well over 1,000,000 surnames in this country.)

> That is about all I can provide. Hope it is of some help.
>
> ----------
> > From: Martin <>
> > To:
> > Subject: Question
> > Date: Wednesday, January 28, 1998 12:27 AM
> >
> > Can anyone tell me about the names LONG, RICHARDSON, DODSON, and GOWER.
> >
> > I have conflicting information about the origins of these surnams.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Connie Long
> >
> > ______________________________

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