Scotch-Irish-L Archives

Archiver > Scotch-Irish > 1998-02 > 0887435614


From: linda Merle <>
Subject: Re: LOCKHART AND MULHOLLAND
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 21:53:34 -0800


Hi Dawn,

LOCKHART is probably Scots. It is not common enough to be in Bell's
"Surnames of Ulster", but there is a family living in Derry today.
"The Surnames of Derry" says it is Scots from a Germanic personal
name. It adds families of this surname settled in Ayrshire and
Lanarkshire in the 12th century. Probalby the source is Black's
book of Scottish surnames.

It also appears on Hanna "The Scotch Irish". It may cost $75 but it
is fantastic. P 285, Vol I places the name in Scotland in the 9th
century. A body of Normans fled to the Scottish court. Macbeth was
king. He was in alliance with the Orkney jarls. His reception of
the Normans did not make the English happy.

>From John Lesley, (1571) "Historie of Scotland, vo. i, b vi.
"Mony Jnglishmen in lyke manner of hich kin and blude followeat
him [Malcolm Canmore] into Scotland, quhome the king of his
liberalities promouet til Dignities, because stoutlie thay
had stande with him in his defense against his ennimies of quhilkes
where CALDER, LOCKHART, GORDOUN, SETOUN, LAUDER, WAWN, MELDROUN,
SCHAW, LERMONT, LIBERTOUN, STRAQUIHIN, ROTRAY, DUNDAS, COCKBURNE,
MYRTOM, JUNGLIS, LESLYE,CARGILL, CUILRA, MAR, MEINZIES,
ABBERCOMMIE, the chiefest: of thir mony nobile houses have tane the
beginning..."

Later, he excerpts "History of the County of Ayr" which says that
the LOCKHARTS of Lanarkshire and Ayrshire are of Anglo-Norman
descent. He recounts many more surnames which are of English
or Welsh origin -- include Wallace and the Stewarts.

Ballybay is a Civil parish. With these dates you should be able
to find their records while in America. Go to a Family History
Center, use the catelog to identify the film with the birth or
marriage record index for that year. Order it if it is not there.
Locate the record in the index, then order the film with the real
record. The indexes are all in the LA Family history center, I
think, so if you live close to LA you can just look it up.

Ryan "Irish Records" doesn't record this church:

> the First Clontibret Presbyterian Church, Ballybay,
But glancing thorugh, many of the church records in Monaghan
are not indexed and are in local hands. I'd go with civil registration.
Having got the place of residence, I'd look them up in the 1901
census.

The mystery is where are the Presbyterian records?

If you are going back, go to a good bookstore and buy a map with
all the roads -- lots of detail -- and a travel book. Then you
can really place Ballybay -- its in the middle of Monaghan,
but if you don't know the area -- this can't help!

Linda Merle

This thread: