Scotch-Irish-L Archives

Archiver > Scotch-Irish > 2006-10 > 1160057524


From: "Nancy Cooper" <>
Subject: [S-I] Steinbeck info
Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2006 07:12:04 -0700
In-Reply-To: <mailman.1287.1160024467.12217.scotch-irish@rootsweb.com>


Thank you for that word picture of Steinbeck searching his family's
homeland. Nancy

-----Original Message-----
From:
[mailto:] On Behalf Of

Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 10:01 PM
To:
Subject: SCOTCH-IRISH Digest, Vol 1, Issue 22



Today's Topics:

1. 1642 Monroe's army muster rolls (Thomas Crossett)
2. 1718 migration and the Roe valley (Robert Forrest)
3. Re: 1718 migration and the Roe valley ()
4. DNA Article ()
5. SP (Betty Holmes)
6. Fw: SP (Betty Holmes)
7. Re: Fw: SP ()
8. Irish Landed Gentry when Cromwell came to Ireland - O'Hart
(Nelda Percival)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 04 Oct 2006 09:15:42 -0400
From: Thomas Crossett <>
Subject: [S-I] 1642 Monroe's army muster rolls
To:
Message-ID: <>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Hi, all,
My folks came to America from Ulster in 1716. Their histories exist in
only one reference. The key man is Anthony duCrozat who was a French
Huguenot. He reportedly came to Ulster in 1640 or thereabouts and
possibly via Scotland. Therefore, the muster lists of 1642 are of GREAT
interest to me. I would be happy to help transcribe if they can be
pulled together from PRO.
Tom Crossett


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 04 Oct 2006 13:11:32 +0000
From: "Robert Forrest" <>
Subject: [S-I] 1718 migration and the Roe valley
To:
Message-ID: <>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Dear List,

The Roe valley is a beautiful area of County Derry centred on the ancient
town of Limavady (Leap of the dog), and the area extends south to the town
of Dungiven, west beyond the village of Ballykelly, east to the parish of
Magilligan and north reaching fertile banks of Lough Foyle. In the early
plantation period (1610-40) this region saw an influx of English settlers
under the auspices of Sir Thomas Phillips, the servitor who built the
Newtown of Limavady about one mile from the original village. The English
settlement was decimated by the 1641 rebellion but when comparative peace
was restored in the 1650s, a second plantation took place and was
predominantly Scottish in character. William Conolly (Speaker of the Irish
House of Commons) purchased the Limavady estate in 1698 and some early
records do survive and are in the PRONI. Included is a list drawn up by
Conollys agent of tenants who had gone or were in the process of going to
the New World from the estate in the year 1718. Almost all of the surnames
are of Scottish origin and the townlands mentioned lie mostly to the north
of Limavady in the fertile plain known as Myroe.

Conolly Estate, Limavady (PRONI T/2825/C/11/1)
A List of persons in the Manor of Limavady, which are gone or going to New
England and how they disposed of their lands, dated 24th August 1718.
James Donning of Carrowmuddle, gone (replaced by William Baird)
Robert Patton of Crindle, gone (replaced by Matthew Patton)
A.C. Patton of Culmore, gone (replaced by John Patton)
Thomas Marten of Burnally, gone (replaced by John Nelly)
John Boule (Boyle?) of Carrowclare, gone (replaced by Edward Moore)
Robert Speer of Crindle, gone (replaced by Thomas Aikin)
John Gay of Culmore, going (replaced by John King)
John Paul of Crindle, gone (replaced by Hugh Paul)
Hugh Boyle of Ballyhenry, going (replaced by William Baird)
John Paterson of Newtownlimavady, gone (replaced by William Patterson)
William Carr of Derrymore, going (replaced by John Oliver)
David Alexander of Carrick Upper, going (replaced by John Alexander junior).
And many more just now upon terms of selling their land.

CHURCH LANDS
John Hamilton, of Mulkeeragh, gone (replaced by His wife Allison ye land)
Thomas Barber of Mulkeeragh, gone (ditto)

Note the name Hamilton in Mulkeeragh townland.

In East of Eden, John Steinbeck wrote about Samuel Hamilton of the Salinas
valley, an emigrant from the north of Ireland, and this character was based
on his maternal grandfather of the same name. Steinbeck knew exactly where
his roots lay and visited county Derry in 1952 searching for his forebears
(the tour is detailed in Colliers' Magazine of 31 January 1953). "We were
looking for a place called Mulkeraugh. You can spell it half a dozen ways
and it isn't on any map. I knew from half-memory that it was near to
Ballykelly, which is near to Limavady, and I knew that from Mulkeraugh you
could look across the lough to the hills of Donegal."On the morning of 18th
August 1952, John Steinbeck and his wife Elaine set out from the city of
Derry in an old car, driven by "a rakish man in a torn cap," which "churned
and clattered" and blew out "a blue, suffocating smoke." They drove right
through "Ballykelly without knowing it was there, but at Limavady they
turned us back. I guess I had thought of Ballykelly as a town; it isn'tit's

what they call in Texas 'a wide place in the road.

Steinbecks maternal grandfather, Samuel Hamilton of Mulkeeragh was baptized

in Ballykelly Presbyterian church on 7 October 1830 and emigrated to America

at the age of 17. Steinbeck was photographed at the Hamilton memorial in the

parish graveyard at Ballykelly Church of Ireland. However, he failed to
meet any living relatives as his last surviving aunt in Ireland, Mary
Elizabeth Hamilton had died on 11 February 1950, aged 84, at Mulkeeragh, two

years before his visit.

The Hamitlons were amongst the earliest Scottish settlers in the valley of
the Roe during the 17th century Plantation and amongst the first wave of
early Ulster migrants to the New World.

Bobby Forrest




------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2006 10:07:54 EDT
From:
Subject: Re: [S-I] 1718 migration and the Roe valley
To: ,
Message-ID: <>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"

For further information on Conolly, check out:
D/2094 LDS film # 1701780
D/1062/1, See LDS film #170571,
D/663, See LDS film # 993210
T2825, See LDS film # 991907
MIC/435 See LDS film # 1701992

****************************************************************************
********
Come visit the Open House for genealogyforum.org all during October. The
Scot
and Irish Interest group will host ten lectures on Friday nights on how to
do
Irish genealogy. All times listed are Eastern time. The conference will be

held in our chat rooms.? These rooms are used for genealogy purposes only
and
there is no charge.
10/6/06
10:15 PM Mistakes We All Make
10:30 PM Finding Your Townland
10:45 PM Passenger Lists
????????
10/13/06????
10:15 PM Civil Registration & church records
10:30 PM Church records (cont.)
10:45 PM Census/Householder's Index

10/20/06????
10:15 PM Manuscripts
10:30 PM Deputy Keeper Reports ??????????????
10:45 PM Genealogical Office
11:00 PM Wills/Probate

10/27/06????
10:15 PM???? David Rencher and Using the Irish Resources at the LDS
??????????????Library
Linda,
Genealogyforum.org
Manager
Irish and Scot chat host



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Wed, 04 Oct 2006 15:01:00 +0000
From:
Subject: [S-I] DNA Article
To:
Message-ID:

<
t>

Content-Type: text/plain

Hi folks, in today's SurnameSearchDaily ( www.freesurnamesearch.com/ to
subscribe, is a link to this
article:http://heritage.scotsman.com/news.cfm?id=1393742006
that interviews Sykes, who has just written a book on DNA in the archepelego
of troubled islands off the western coast of Europe detailing his findings.
The title says it all:
"We're nearly all Celts under the skin". The early man in wins the
gene-race, so we're largely all Celts from Spain.

It says:
"Previously it was thought that ancient Britons were Celts who came from
central Europe, but the genetic connection to populations in Spain provides
a scientific basis for part of the ancient Scots' origin myth.
"The Declaration of Arbroath of 1320, following the War of Independence
against England, tells how the Scots arrived in Scotland after they had
"dwelt for a long course of time in Spain among the most savage tribes"."
What is amazing to me is the survival of the oral history that we wintered
the Ice Age in Spain.
Anyway, an interesting article. Thought some would enjoy.
Linda Merle

------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2006 10:23:21 -0700
From: "Betty Holmes" <>
Subject: [S-I] SP
To: <>
Cc:
Message-ID: <000801c6e7d9$cac315a0$>
Content-Type: text/plain;charset="iso-8859-1"

For those searching for SP; it is probably Scots Peerage by J.B.Paul at the
Salt Lake Library of LDS. Although it says Peerage, complete family
genealogies are in the IX Volumes that I brought into our local Family
History Center. Volume IX is an index to the other volumes. You need it to
find your people. It is a great source for genealogies before 1850.

I was unaware of later volumes, but will check it out.

Thanks, Betty Holmes

------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2006 10:32:07 -0700
From: "Betty Holmes" <>
Subject: [S-I] Fw: SP
To: <>
Message-ID: <006b01c6e7db$04164420$>
Content-Type: text/plain;charset="iso-8859-1"


----- Original Message -----
From: Betty Holmes
To:
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 10:23 AM
Subject: SP


For those searching for SP; it is probably Scots Peerage by J.B.Paul at the
Salt Lake Library of LDS. Although it says Peerage, complete family
genealogies are in the IX Volumes that I brought into our local Family
History Center. Volume IX is an index to the other volumes. You need it to
find your people. It is a great source for genealogies before 1850.

I was unaware of later volumes, but will check it out.

Thanks, Betty Holmes

------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Wed, 04 Oct 2006 18:01:02 +0000
From:
Subject: Re: [S-I] Fw: SP
To: "Betty Holmes" <>, <>
Message-ID:

<
et>

Content-Type: text/plain

Hi Betty, if you mean SP 16 at the PRO, no, it is 'State Papers". It is a
records group, not a book, but thanks!

Linda Merle

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "Betty Holmes" <>

>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Betty Holmes
> To:
> Cc:
> Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 10:23 AM
> Subject: SP
>
>
> For those searching for SP; it is probably Scots Peerage by J.B.Paul at
the Salt
> Lake Library of LDS. Although it says Peerage, complete family genealogies
are
> in the IX Volumes that I brought into our local Family History Center.
Volume
> IX is an index to the other volumes. You need it to find your people. It
is a
> great source for genealogies before 1850.
>
> I was unaware of later volumes, but will check it out.
>
> Thanks, Betty Holmes
>
> -------------------------------
> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to
> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the
quotes
> in the subject and the body of the message

------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Wed, 04 Oct 2006 21:45:49 -0700
From: "Nelda Percival" <>
Subject: [S-I] Irish Landed Gentry when Cromwell came to Ireland -
O'Hart
To:
Message-ID: <>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Hi,
I have been reading this book and was wondering if anyone could tell me if
there is a significance to a surname spelled
Ffarrell and then in a different place being written Farrell..(Two different

people) I have noticed other surnames that have had the first letter
doubled.

Does this mean anything?

Thanks
Nelda

Nelda's websites -
http://freepages.folklore.rootsweb.com/~bonsteinandgilpin/
yDNA tests for Hurst, Beatty, Gilpin, Graves; all direct male relatives




------------------------------

To contact the SCOTCH-IRISH list administrator, send an email to
.

To post a message to the SCOTCH-IRISH mailing list, send an email to
.

__________________________________________________________
To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to

with the word "unsubscribe" without the quotes in the subject and the body
of the
email with no additional text.


End of SCOTCH-IRISH Digest, Vol 1, Issue 22
*******************************************



This thread: