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From: Belinda Allender <>
Subject: Re: [TAULBEE] William Preston Taulbee's murder in 1890
Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2007 22:16:27 -0800 (PST)
In-Reply-To: <67336A57-588D-4808-B9D7-9C7A47C68A13@aol.com>


1880 Census Magoffin County, KY
Presinst 1 June 1880 Charles Sublett enumerator
#133
Taulbee, Will P. m 29 KY KY KY County Clerk
Liew E. f 21 KY KY KY
James H. m 08 KY KY KY
John H. m 06 KY KY KY
Joseph T. m 04 KY KY KY

Shot by unknown gunman from window while Will Preston was on the House steps of the Capitol. Supposingly you can still see the blood stains.

Search Terms: TAULBEE (1)
Database: Biographical Directory of the American Congress
Combined Matches: 1
Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
Biographies
T
page 1897
TAULBEE, William Preston, a Representative from Kentucky; born near Mount Sterling, in Morgan County, Ky., October 22, 1851; attended the common schools and was tutored by his father; was ordained for the ministry and admitted to the Kentucky conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South; elected clerk of the Magoffin County Court in 1878 and reelected in 1882; studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1881; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Congresses (March 4, 1885-March 3, 1889); was not a candidate for renomination; was shot by Charles E. Kincaid in the Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 28, 1890, and died from the effects of the wounds at Providence Hospital, in that city, March 11, 1890; interment in the family burying ground near Mount Sterling, Ky.

Found at:
http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/tallm-taylo.html
Louise

Political Graveyard

Taulbee, William Preston (1851-1890)
Born in Morgan County, Ky., October 22, 1851.
U.S. Representative from Kentucky 10th District, 1885-89.
Shot by Charles E. Kincaid in the Capitol Building,
Washington, D.C. February 28, 1890,
and died from the effects of the wounds
at Providence Hospital, March 11, 1890.
Interment in private or family graveyard.
Congressional Biography
TAULBEE, William Preston, 1851-1890
TAULBEE, William Preston, a Representative from Kentucky;
born near Mount Sterling, in Morgan County, Ky., October 22, 1851;
attended the common schools and was tutored by his father;
was ordained for the ministry and admitted to the Kentucky
conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South;
elected clerk of the Magoffin County Court in 1878
and reelected in 1882; studied law and was admitted
to the bar in 1881; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-ninth
and Fiftieth Congresses (March 4, 1885-March 3, 1889);
was not a candidate for renomination; was shot
by Charles E. Kincaid in the Capitol Building, Washington, D.C.,
February 28, 1890, and died from the effects of the wounds
at Providence Hospital, in that city, March 11, 1890;
interment in the family burying ground near Mount Sterling, Ky.
Bibliography
Klotter, J. C. “Sex, Scandal, and Suffrage in the Gilded Age.”
Historian 42 (February 1980): 225-43.
__________________________________________________________________

Washington, March 1. - (Special.)-
Mr. Chas. F. Kincaid passed a comfortable night in the private room at the stationhouse, to which the police officials had assigned him, and this morning he was allowed to go to his own boarding place for breakfast. He was accompanied by an officer in citizen's clothes, and after remaining at his room for some time he was escorted to the office of C. Maurice Smith, one of his attorneys, and he stayed there until 3:30, receiving the calls of a great many of his friends, and then in company with Mr. Smith and a number of newspaper men he went over to the Police Court, where application for bail was made. This proceeding was brief and the bail was fixed at $2,000 by Judge Miller, and that of itself was a most favorable consideration.
Gen. H. V. Boynton and Mr. Robert J. Wynne, of the Washington Bureau of the Cincinnati Commercial Gazette, Col. H. M. F. E. Von Stamp, the latter well known in Louisville, and your correspondent, as well as a number of others, including a wealthy Virginian, were present, ready and anxious to go on the bond of Mr. Kincaid. The Judge first examined Col. Von Stamp, and that gentleman, having sworn that he had property which would sell for from forth to fifty thousand dollars under the hammer and that he would be willing to put up the whole of it for Mr. Kincaid, Judge Miller decided that Col. Von Stamp was ample security for the amount, and Mr. Kincaid was thereupon, promptly released on bail. He was down town this evening, and everywhere his friends expressed their good wishes, and all day he has been in receipt of telegrams, letters and cards, bearing messages of warm friendship, the senders kindly offering to do anything in their power that would aid him.
MR. TAULBEE'S CONDITION
Mr. Taulbee, the wounded man, is resting comfortably at the Providence Hospital, and received a number of callers to-day. Among the number was Representative McCreary, of Kentucky. He said just after his return from the hospital this afternoon:
"I found Taulbee doing well. His brain was clear, and he conversed easily and apparently without pain, and talked to me on a business subject in which we are both interested. He is going to recover. Kincaid will be cleared at the investigation, and then I hope the trouble will all be over. I will do for Kincaid all in my power. I am not connected with the case, but I cheerfully offered my services to Kincaid."
Dr. Bayne the attending physician, made the following statement this afternoon regarding Mr. Taulbee's condition.
"He is decidedly better. His temperature is 100, his pulse seventy and his respiration normal. The bullet has not been extracted as yet, and it is thought that in its present position it is doing no further damage, at it would be more dangerous to extract it, then to keep it, for the present. There is of course, considerable danger of inflammation still, but at present I am very hopeful of the recovery of the patient,
"The ball," said the doctor, "struck just at the outer edge of the left eye, fracturing the bond and passing downward for a distance of probably two and a half inches form its entrance, and lodging in the maxillary bone, where at present, it is doing no damage."
OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.
The Evening Star prints very good pictures to-day of both Kincaid and Taulbee, and that paper pays Mr. Kincaid many compliments, speaking of him as a man of the steadiest habits, of a peaceable and inoffensive disposition and who would be one of the last men to provoke or engage in a fight, and
that he is not in the habit of carrying weapons; but procured one yesterday because he felt that his life was in danger.
The Washington Critic printed the following this evening regarding the case:
"The shooting was a general topic of conversation at the Capitol this morning, and the general feeling is that it was little short of a desecration to indulge in attacks of personal violence beneath the dome of the capitol. Yet, when it was learned that Taulbee had been pursuing Kincaid for months, and had insulted him previously to this, the only wonder is that the shooting did not occur earlier. He had been warned to let Kincaid alone, but contemptuously pronounced him a coward and continued his persecutions. The insult of yesterday was too gross to be let pass without being resented, and as the physical disparity between the two men precluded a physical encounter, there was nothing left but to shoot. Kincaid had endeavored to avoid the encounter, but in vain."
NOTHING TO SAY
Captain Sam Donelson, ex-Door-Keeper of the House, who was the only eye-witness of the shooting still refuses to talk of the matter. He says both Mr. Taulbee and Mr. Kincaid may talk all they want to, but as for him, he has only one story to tell, and that in the courts. He is a friend of both parties and they are, he says, friends of his friends, and while he deeply deplores the matter, he will not talk about it.
Last night at the station-house a tall good looking man walked in bearing in his arms a huge bundle of bedclothes. He did not even know Mr. Kincaid; but said that he had read of his arrest and did not want him to lack for accommodations. This was a real kind and amusing offer; but as the officers had provided Kincaid with a private room upstairs, he did not need the bed clothing, though appreciating his unknown friend's good intentions.

Only a short article appeared in the Louisville Herald-Courier on March 3, 1890
Inquiry at the Providence Hospital to-night showed the condition of ex-Congressman Taulbee was still entirely favorable.
He rested all day, and seems to be on the road to recovery.
His physician says that he is doing as nicely as he could wish, and he thinks he will soon be out of danger.
Mr. Kincaid has recovered from the nervous shock of the affair, and is in a composed condition to-day.
The friends of both parties hope that Mr. Taulbee will not enter into a serious prosecution of the case.
_____________________________________________________________
The Arizona Republic
Vol. 2 - No. 120
Phoenix, Friday Morning, March 27, 1891
The Taulbee Case
Examination of Witnesses Begun in Washington Yesterday
Washington, March 26----A number of witnesses in the
Kincaid trial were examined this morning.
William McCormick, one of the doorkeepers of the House,
said he heard Taulbee call Kincaid a liar before the shooting
occurred. Kincaid asked witness at that time what he should
do in regard to the trouble. Witness said he had no advice to
give. Said Kincaid: "I am not able to cope with such a man
as Taulbee, I have been sick and am weak, and more than
that, I was not armed". A short time after, however, this
witness heard the report of a pistol.
Woodbridge, another doorkeeper, substantially corroborated
McCormick’s testimony, except that he testified to having seen
Taulbee pull Kincaid’s ear.
------------
The Arizona Republic
Vol. 2? - No. 123
Phoenix, Tuesday Morning, March 31, 1891
Kincaid’s Trial
Strong Testimony in his Defense Admitted by Judge Bradley
Washington, March 30---In the Kincaid case today Judge
Bradley ruled that testimony going to show deceased had on
various occasions threatened the life of defendant was
admissable.
William E. Curtis, Percy Heath, ex-congressman LaFloon?
and others were called and told of threats that they heard made
by Taulbee after the publication in the Louisville paper of which
Kincaid was correspondent of the story of the scandalous
occurence in the patent office in which Taulbee and a female
clerk figured.
-------------
The Arizona Republic
Phoenix, Wednesday Morning, April 1, 1891
[1 small paragraph]
Before adjournment of the Kincaid trial, at Washington yesterday,
a number of witnesses testified as to threats made by Taulbee
against Kincaid, of Taulbee telling him that he had better arm
himself, etc.
The Arizona Republic
Phoenix, Thursday Morning, April 9, 1891
Vol. 2 - No. 131
KINCAID ACQUITTED
Washington, April 8---The jury in the case of James E.
Kincaid, the newspaper correspondent indicted for
shooting ex-Representative Taulbee, of Kentucky, in
February 1890, after being out nearly three hours this
afternoon, returned a verdict of not guilty. When the
foreman announced the verdict KinKincaid heartily shook
the hand of each juror thanking them for the verdict.
His friends warmly congratulated him.
------------

I located a site www.alphalink.com.au/--kincaid/uskin/obit2.htm that has further information and a copy of the obituary of Charles Kincaid. It seems he was acquitted of the crime of killing William P. Taulbee. He died 16 years later on November 3, 1906, having spent the last ten years of his life with The Cincinnati Enquirer as a reporter.
There is a more recent mention of William P. Taulbee in the Kentucky Post, dated October 15, 2002, comparing then Governor Paul Patton's sex scandal with that of ex-Congressman Taulbee. It's worth a read: www.kypost.com/2002/10/15/craig101502.html
Joyce
__________________________________________________
Scandal ended in murder
Patton's affair not a first for state
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Kentucky Post
By Berry Craig
Associated Press
LOUISVILLE — A Louisville newspaper shocks the state with a juicy story about a sex scandal involving a popular and powerful eastern Kentucky politician.
"It's big news nationwide," says Frankfort historian Ron Bryant.
Purportedly, the public servant is caught "in a compromising way" with his mistress, "a little daisy." The young woman is said to be "bright as a sunbeam and saucy as a bowl of jelly; petite of figure but plump as a partridge."
His political career wrecked, the alleged adulterer angrily confronts the reporter who wrote the story. He pulls the reporter's ear. The reporter pulls a pistol.
On Feb. 28, 1890, Charles E. Kincaid of the Louisville Times shot ex-Congressman William Preston Taulbee, a Salyersville Democrat, at the U.S. Capitol. According to legend, the lawmaker's blood stained the shiny marble steps where he fell, fatally wounded. Taulbee died on March 11, 1890, after the Washington Star reported he had "expressed no resentment" toward his assailant. But the congressman "thought the manner of the shooting was cowardly."
Kincaid confessed to killing the unarmed Taulbee. Charged with first-degree murder, the reporter was hauled into court where two witnesses swore they saw him shoot the ex-congressman. In yet another strange twist to the tale, the jury found Kincaid innocent, ruling it a case of self-defense.
The Taulbee tryst made the history books. The sex scandal swirling around Gov. Paul Patton probably will, too.
"Political scandals have rocked the administrations of other governors," said Bryant, Kentucky history specialist at the state historical society. "This is apparently the first sex scandal involving a (Kentucky) governor, or at least the first one that made it into print."
Patton, a Democrat from Pikeville, confessed that he committed adultery.
"Taulbee blamed Kincaid for ruining his career and his personal life, but he evidently did not confirm or deny the charge of infidelity in Kincaid's story," Bryant said.
The historian added that Kincaid even promised Taulbee, a former Methodist minister, ample space in the Times to refute his account of the affair. "Apparently, Taulbee never took Kincaid up on his offer," Bryant said.
After Kincaid's story ran in the Times in 1888, Taulbee, dubbed "the mountain orator," decided against a third term in the House of Representatives and became a Washington lobbyist.
He and his wife of 17 years also separated, according to James C. Klotter, Kentucky state historian.
Taulbee became the sworn enemy of Kincaid, who had been private secretary to Gov. Proctor Knott, a Democrat. They scuffled once before the reporter said he decided to steer clear of the ex-congressman to avoid further trouble, Klotter wrote in a 1980 issue of The Historian, a scholarly journal.
Taulbee, 39, and Kincaid, five years his foe's junior, clashed twice at the Capitol on fateful Feb. 28, 1890.
The first encounter was bloodless, beginning with heated words and ending with Taulbee yanking Kincaid's ear, Klotter wrote. A pair of doorkeepers pried the combatants apart.
Before going their separate ways, Kincaid told Taulbee he was "a small man and unarmed." The strapping Taulbee, about a foot taller than the frail, 5-3 Kincaid, warned the reporter "he had better arm himself," Klotter wrote.
Kincaid took Taulbee's advice. When the men met again two hours later on the steps leading to a basement restaurant, Kincaid produced a revolver and shot Taulbee in the head, close to his eye.
Louisville newspapers rallied to Kincaid, arguing that Taulbee was a big bully who had repeatedly threatened and abused the little reporter, and even had attacked him.
"The Courier-Journal fueled its Commonwealth's growing reputation for lawlessness by suggesting that `that which may be regarded in Kentucky and other states of the Union as a matter of self-defense is treated here in Washington as murder in the first-degree,'" Klotter wrote. "As it developed, the District of Columbia's code apparently did not differ from Kentucky's after all: Kincaid was acquitted."





Virginia Burton <> wrote:
Thanks for sending the article. I already had it. I'm hoping to
find the articles that caused the quarrel.

Are you a relative? I'm finding cousins that I didn't know I had.

Virginia Burton
On Jan 11, 2007, at 8:51 AM, bdcollins wrote:

> Here's what I have. I "must" have gotten it from the historical
> newspapers
> online, although I don't remember. Also, I didn't put down the
> date for the
> newspaper.
> ``````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
> ```````````````````````
> Scandal ended in murder, Patton's affair not a first for state
> ______________________________________________
> By Berry Craig
> Associated Press
>
> LOUISVILLE - A Louisville newspaper shocks the state with a juicy
> story
> about a sex scandal involving a popular and powerful eastern Kentucky
> politician.
> "It's big news nationwide," says Frankfort historian Ron Bryant.
>
> Purportedly, the public servant is caught "in a compromising way"
> with his
> mistress, "a little daisy." The young woman is said to be "bright as a
> sunbeam and saucy as a bowl of jelly; petite of figure but plump as a
> partridge."
>
> His political career wrecked, the alleged adulterer angrily
> confronts the
> reporter who wrote the story. He pulls the reporter's ear. The
> reporter
> pulls a pistol.
>
> On Feb. 28, 1890, Charles E. Kincaid of the Louisville Times shot
> ex-Congressman William Preston Taulbee, a Salyersville Democrat, at
> the U.S.
> Capitol. According to legend, the lawmaker's blood stained the
> shiny marble
> steps where he fell, fatally wounded. Taulbee died on March 11,
> 1890, after
> the Washington Star reported he had "expressed no resentment"
> toward his
> assailant. But the congressman "thought the manner of the shooting was
> cowardly."
>
> Kincaid confessed to killing the unarmed Taulbee. Charged with
> first-degree
> murder, the reporter was hauled into court where two witnesses
> swore they
> saw him shoot the ex-congressman. In yet another strange twist to
> the tale,
> the jury found Kincaid innocent, ruling it a case of self-defense.
>
> The Taulbee tryst made the history books. The sex scandal swirling
> around
> Gov. Paul Patton probably will, too.
>
> "Political scandals have rocked the administrations of other
> governors,"
> said Bryant, Kentucky history specialist at the state historical
> society.
> "This is apparently the first sex scandal involving a (Kentucky)
> governor,
> or at least the first one that made it into print."
>
> Patton, a Democrat from Pikeville, confessed that he committed
> adultery.
>
> "Taulbee blamed Kincaid for ruining his career and his personal
> life, but he
> evidently did not confirm or deny the charge of infidelity in
> Kincaid's
> story," Bryant said.
>
> The historian added that Kincaid even promised Taulbee, a former
> Methodist
> minister, ample space in the Times to refute his account of the
> affair.
> "Apparently, Taulbee never took Kincaid up on his offer," Bryant said.
>
> After Kincaid's story ran in the Times in 1888, Taulbee, dubbed "the
> mountain orator," decided against a third term in the House of
> Representatives and became a Washington lobbyist.
>
> He and his wife of 17 years also separated, according to James C.
> Klotter,
> Kentucky state historian.
>
> Taulbee became the sworn enemy of Kincaid, who had been private
> secretary to
> Gov. Proctor Knott, a Democrat. They scuffled once before the
> reporter said
> he decided to steer clear of the ex-congressman to avoid further
> trouble,
> Klotter wrote in a 1980 issue of The Historian, a scholarly journal.
>
> Taulbee, 39, and Kincaid, five years his foe's junior, clashed
> twice at the
> Capitol on fateful Feb. 28, 1890.
>
> The first encounter was bloodless, beginning with heated words and
> ending
> with Taulbee yanking Kincaid's ear, Klotter wrote. A pair of
> doorkeepers
> pried the combatants apart.
>
> Before going their separate ways, Kincaid told Taulbee he was "a
> small man
> and unarmed." The strapping Taulbee, about a foot taller than the
> frail, 5-3
> Kincaid, warned the reporter "he had better arm himself," Klotter
> wrote.
>
> Kincaid took Taulbee's advice. When the men met again two hours
> later on the
> steps leading to a basement restaurant, Kincaid produced a revolver
> and shot
> Taulbee in the head, close to his eye.
>
> Louisville newspapers rallied to Kincaid, arguing that Taulbee was
> a big
> bully who had repeatedly threatened and abused the little reporter,
> and even
> had attacked him.
>
> "The Courier-Journal fueled its Commonwealth's growing reputation for
> lawlessness by suggesting that `that which may be regarded in
> Kentucky and
> other states of the Union as a matter of self-defense is treated
> here in
> Washington as murder in the first-degree,'" Klotter wrote. "As it
> developed,
> the District of Columbia's code apparently did not differ from
> Kentucky's
> after all: Kincaid was acquitted."
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From:
> To:
> Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 4:11 PM
> Subject: [TAULBEE] William Preston Taulbee's murder in 1890
>
>
>> This is a Message Board Post that is gatewayed to this mailing list.
>>
>> Surnames: Taulbee, Hinds, Burton
>> Classification: queries
>>
>> Message Board URL:
>>
>> http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.taulbee/272/mb.ashx
>>
>> Message Board Post:
>>
>> I am the great granddaughter of Congressman Taulbee. NPR has
>> contacted me
>> about doing a story on his murder in the Capitol in 1890. The
>> reporter
>> has promised me that it is not going to be one of the ghost-in-the-
>> capitol
>> stories that ABC news did every Hallowe'en, nor is its focus going
>> to be
>> gossip about the so-called "Patent Office Scandal." If anyone has
>> copies
>> of the articles in the Washington, DC Evening Sun or the
>> Louisville Times
>> that Kincaid published, I would like to have a copy. I am also
>> interested
>> in any other documents pertaining to the murder.
>> Virginia Hinds Burton
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to
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>>
>
>
>
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