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From: "Caroline Gurney" <>
Subject: Re: [TMG] on verso
Date: Tue, 8 May 2001 21:48:14 +0100
References: <5.0.2.1.0.20010506221536.02937e50@127.0.0.1> <001901c0d6bd$400c8820$195bfea9@cyrixpr150> <004e01c0d6f9$0427eca0$1504883e@carolinegurney> <002a01c0d7ec$ea7a2120$195bfea9@cyrixpr150> <3AF85302.7E25FAAC@datasys.net>


Thanks to Jim Blease for posting the guide to Latin phrases:

http://www.les.aston.ac.uk/latin.html

I enjoyed reading through them & the associated link:

http://depthome.brooklyn.cuny.edu/classics/englatin.htm

They are a reminder of how much Latin is still a part of our everyday
language

I'm not sure how familiar listers outside the UK are with the TV comedy
series "Blackadder" but I have always enjoyed Baldrick's interpretation of
"magnum opus" as "magnificent octopus". It has been regularly used in this
household to describe everything from my children's GCSE coursework to the
mega family history which their mother is going to publish "one day".

Jim suggested that "ibid, loc. cit. and op. cit. are virtually synonymous,
aren't they?"

My understanding of the distinction between ibid & op cit is that the former
is used only to refer to the immediately previous footnote whilst the latter
can be used to refer to a work cited anywhere previously in the footnotes.

Caroline Gurney
Portsmouth, UK




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