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From: "Marian Pierre-Louis" <>
Subject: [TGF] family vs. geography
Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2009 06:36:30 -0400
References: <001e01c9a2c6$0c8c5ec0$25a51c40$@net><C5DDD74E.8755%rajanisg@earthlink.net>
In-Reply-To: <C5DDD74E.8755%rajanisg@earthlink.net>


Janis and everyone -

When I first got involved with genealogy seriously I imagined that I would
become a specialist in the geographic area of my family ancestry - New York,
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island. When I decided to become a professional
genealogist and take on clients I started diving into my local repositories
and resources as a way to hone my skills. I soon realized that specializing
in the geographic areas of my ancestors wasn't going to work. I knew I
wouldn't be able to get to New York and Pennsylvania in a timely or
efficient manner to get my hands on all the undigitized or unpublished
materials that would allow me to demonstrate my professionalism. As a
result I have become a specialist in a region I never expected -
Massachusetts. I laugh (sometimes cry) when I think how much time I spend
on Southern New England research and completely neglect my own family
research. I have embraced Massachusetts genealogy and history and through
interaction with other local researchers (mostly APG members) I am learning
to be an expert in my niche. When the time comes for me to get back to my
family genealogy I know I will be a better researcher for the skills that I
have acquired.

So Janis I would say - embrace the SC research. You will find it rewarding
becoming an expert in your local region.

Marian Pierre-Louis
Fieldstone Historic Research
http://www.FieldstoneHistoricResearch.com



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