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From: Patti Hobbs <>
Subject: Re: [TGF] Fathers and Rulers petition
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 13:52:37 -0500
References: <20090415110530.6be8dfbc20d2e7d5fe2bfc59d59114c3.9a8b1c1666.wbe@email02.secureserver.net><2bba9ee60904160421j28143682t1dfb43b9ed36d53f@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <2bba9ee60904160421j28143682t1dfb43b9ed36d53f@mail.gmail.com>


I still haven't gotten a chance to get to the articles and links referenced,
but thought I'd add one more note to pique (more than pique?!) your
interest. As I've continued reading this book, petitions originating from
specific locations have been mentioned. So far (through page 226) they've
mostly been from Massachusetts and Vermont and New Hampshire, although one
petition of 170 people from western Pennsylvania was mentioned. Because the
petitions were instigated by the abolitionist groups, I'm sure they are more
widespread than those locations reflect. Because John Quincy Adams was the
first vocal advocate (if anyone in this book is the hero, it's JQA) of the
petitioners, a lot of those earlier petitions discussed in this book are
from Massachusetts.

Here is what one of the other vocal advocates of the petitioners did:

"Cushing started by pointing out the unusual feminization of his
district, almost as an excuse for what he felt he now had to do: 'It
happened that in his district the fair sex greatly outnumbered the other ...
so that he was probably the immediate representative of more ladies than any
other member of the House.' It was in obedience to the 3,824 of 'his fair
constitutents' (whom it was at all times his pleasure to serve) that he
presented petitions praying for the abolition of slavery and the slave trade
in the District of Columbia from the city of Lowell and the towns of
Amesbury, Andover, Haverhill, Newburyport, Reading, and Salisbury."

Gee, whiz !! Almost 4,000 women's names in 1836.

Patti



On Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 6:21 AM, Patti Hobbs <> wrote:

> Linda,
>
> I did want to thank you for posting these articles. I haven't had a chance
> to look at them yet, but I think I will later today.
>
> Patti
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 15, 2009 at 1:05 PM, <> wrote:
>
>>
>> Spent a little time on NARA's site -- I suspect we would find the
>> original petitions at NARA.
>>
>> Some related NARA links:
>>
>> Online finding aids:
>>
>> Guide to the Records of the U.S. Senate at the National Archives (Record
>> Group 46)
>>
>> http://www.archives.gov/legislative/guide/senate/table-of-contents-short.html
>>
>> Note Chapter 18 Records of Senate Select Committees, 1789-1988, in
>> particular 18.30:
>> http://www.archives.gov/legislative/guide/senate/chapter-18-1847-1921.html
>>
>> Guide to the Records of the U.S. House of Representatives at the
>> National Archives, 1789-1989 (Record Group 233)
>>
>> http://www.archives.gov/legislative/guide/house/table-of-contents-short.html
>>
>> I looked for online Prologue articles discussing these records.
>>
>> One 'petition' related article pertained to individual petitions,
>> primarily relating to military pensions. Interesting, but not the same
>> sort of petition.
>>
>> http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2007/spring/genea-accompany.html
>>
>> Another article in footnote 19 discusses studies regarding petition
>> records.
>>
>> http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2000/winter/hydra-slave-trade-documentation-2.html
>>
>> The NARA publication "Our Mothers Before Us: Women and Democracy,
>> 1789-1920" sounds like it would be useful!
>> http://www.archives.gov/legislative/publications/
>>
>> Wish I lived in the DC area!
>> Linda
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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