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From: "Peggy Baldwin at Family Passages" <>
Subject: Re: [TGF] EE Discussion - Example for analysis (1)
Date: Sun, 3 Oct 2010 11:03:19 -0700
References: <197700.6696.qm@web37507.mail.mud.yahoo.com><275369C9-D81A-4BC9-B7B5-42B3F5234F5E@me.com>
In-Reply-To: <275369C9-D81A-4BC9-B7B5-42B3F5234F5E@me.com>


The clue to me that this document is an abstract (not a photocopy), is that
it didn't include information that all of the marriage records, certificate,
or marriage book generally include. At a bare minimum, all of the marriage
records I have seen have included witnesses.

I'm also imagining the clerk putting the same piece of paper into his/her
typewriter, year after year, until the page is full. I do think it would
have been much quicker to hand write the entries. This is a clue to me that
the typed page was made later.

Peggy

Peggy Baldwin, MLS
Family Passages LLC
www.family-passages.com
503-916-9410
Pacific Northwest & Oregon Trail

-----Original Message-----
From:
[mailto:] On Behalf Of
Jacqueline Wilson
Sent: Sunday, October 03, 2010 10:12 AM
To: TGF
Subject: Re: [TGF] EE Discussion - Example for analysis (1)

Ginger, one way to tell typed versus photocopy is if the paper is indented
where the keys of the typewriter hit the paper. This is especially true
with manual typewriters. Photocopies will be smooth on the back.
On Oct 3, 2010, at 11:58 AM, Ginger Smith wrote:

I know I'm a little behind in this discussion, but just wanted to add my two

cents...

1. First of all, I would like to know, how do you know it was a typed copy
and
not xerox of original?
2. If it was a typed copy maybe transcriber could not read place of death
written on original, thus the "-"?
3. Linda has good idea to look at the rules that should have been put in
place
at the time death record created. We have talked about this a lot in my
archives classes. If the "rules" were not put in writing, then a review of
other
death certificates written up around the same time might help determine a
pattern of how the place of death was captured.
Ginger



Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2010 19:10:56 -0700
From: <>
Subject: Re: [TGF] EE Discussion - Example for analysis (1)

Christy...

In the example Michelle gave us, there's a '-' for place of death.
Guess it's better than a blank. at least we know the person filling
out the form didn't just "forget" to enter the information. Would this
qualify as "absence of information that should exist under particular
circumstances" ? It is a death record after all. What does the
fact that place is missing imply for the primary/secondary nature of the
death date information? Perhaps the person reporting death date wasn't
so close to the event after all, if place 'wasn't known.' Assuming
that's the reason the info is missing--because the informant didn't
know.

But there could be other reasons, like filling in place only for places
other than the town proper--the 'unusual' places of death. It's
possible that understanding the full context of the source creation
would illuminate why there's no information recorded for place of death.
That situation is sort of like your example, Christy, where
understanding the context of word choice enables sound analysis. Is
information really missing, if the context explains why it's not
recorded? That doesn't seem to come under the EE definition--because
once one understands the circumstances then there's no reason to expect
the info to be recorded. LOL

If the case is that death place was supposed to be recorded and it was
not for this record, what would it take to draw a reliable inference
based upon the fact that this information is missing? To my thinking,
it would at least take analysis of the full record set for that town
clerk--when that info was present, when it was missing, looking for
patterns, etc, etc. or looking at the instructions associated with the
creation of the original source in that place and time and then
analyzing the full source for its adherence to the instructions. I'm
sure those with more experience can think of more factors we would need
to understand thoroughly before making any inference for this specific
record based upon the fact that information is missing. And I'm not
sure that even after having done all that, that one would be able to
draw a reliable inference, although we might have a better idea of the
*probability* associated with different inferences. I have not yet
found any published literature that discusses this type of analysis of
sources, perhaps I'm not reading the appropriate publications. But if
these type of analyses are not done then I don't understand how anyone
can draw any inference from the sole fact that information is missing
(or a record is missing).

Linda
____________
Linda Gardner
Massachusetts

>>
>>> -------- Original Message --------
>>> Subject: [TGF] EE Discussion - Example for analysis (1)
>>> From: Michele Kemper <>
>>> Date: Tue, September 28, 2010 2:59 pm
>>> To: Transitional Genealogy Forum
>>> <>
>>>
>>>
>>> Hey, everyone. To supplement the EE discussion, I wanted to start
>>> posting some examples to start analyzing. I hope this will help some of
>>> us "youngsters" to get a deeper understanding of the nuances of evidence
>>> analysis.
>>>
>>> I decided to post ones that are generally available without any logins
>>> or memberships required. I may eventually post some of my own documents
>>> to further things along. But, if anyone has any of their own examples
>>> online, jump in.
>>>
>>> Here is the first one. It is a death certificate from the early years of
>>> the 1900s.
>>>
>>>
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~larsonmorgan/Morgan/record
s/death%20certificate%20-%20Morgan,%20James.html
> l
>>>
>
<http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/%7Elarsonmorgan/Morgan/rec
ords/death%20certificate%20-%20Morgan,%20James.html>
>
>>>
>>> 1. Original or derivative source?
>>> 2. Primary or secondary evidence? Which pieces of information fit those
>>> categories?
>>> 3. Based on a research question such as "When and where did James Morgan
>>> die?" Is this direct or indirect evidence? Does it provide negative
>>> evidence?
>>> 4. Do you have any other thoughts on this example?
>>>
>>> Michele
>>> The Transitional Genealogists List was created to provide a supportive
>>> environment for genealogists to learn best practices as they transition
>>> to professional level work. Please respect the kind intentions of this
>>> list.
>>> -------------------------------
>>> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to
>>> with the word
>>> 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the
>>> message



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Jacqueline Wilson
Evanston, IL


Professional Indexer, Historian, and Genealogist
Deputy Sheriff for Publications of the Chicago Corral of the Westerners
IASPR Newsletter Editor

"Wilssearch - your service of choice for the indexing challenged
genealogist."







The Transitional Genealogists List was created to provide a supportive
environment for genealogists to learn best practices as they transition to
professional level work. Please respect the kind intentions of this list.
-------------------------------
To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to
with the word
'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message


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