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Subject: [WARREN] JOHN de WARENNE,8th Earl and his Mistress's
Date: 22 Sep 2003 09:55:40 -0600


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John de Warenne, 8th Earl + Joan de Barr & his mistress's


The Last Earl Warenne -- Conisbrough

John died in 1304 and, since his own son William had been killed at a tournament in Guildford in 1286, he was succeeded by his eighteen-year-old grandson John. A marriage was arranged for him to Joan de Barr, granddaughter of King Edward I. This was not a happy marriage and there were no children; John was thus the eighth and last Earl Warenne. By 1313 Earl John was separated from his wife. Then began a series of efforts to obtain a divorce which were repeatedly unsuccessful. At last it seemed in 1316 that the divorce would be allowed, but once again judgement went against Earl John and, rightly or wrongly, he held Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, responsible for the failure of his case. Intending insult rather than romance, therefore, Earl John abducted Lancaster’s wife Alice. Lancaster retaliated by promptly divorcing her and seizing the Warenne castles of Sandal and Conisbrough from his seat at Pontefract in November 1317. At this point King Edward II intervened and an !
uneasy agreement was reached, under which Earl Thomas retained the Yorkshire castles.

Lancaster did not hold Conisbrough for long , for in 1322 he led a rebellion against the King which ended with the battle of Boroughbridge. Thomas was captured and tried for treason, found guilty then executed outside the walls of his own castle at Pontefract. Subsequently Conisbrough was then held by Edward II until 1326, the king stayed briefly at Conisbrough in November 1322, in 1324 he ordered the expenditure of up to 40 marks on repairing the towers and walls of the castles at Pontefract and Conisbrough.

The castle was delivered back to John de Warenne in 1326. He seems to have regained security of tenure during the early years of the reign of Edward III, and certainly by 1331-32. Though unable to divorce his wife, John had two sons by Maud de Nerford who had been the wife of Sir Simon de Derby. By a conveyance ratified by the king, John attempted to secure the tenure of the manor and castle of Conisbrough for his two sons and for Maud after his death; but the careful plan went awry, for John outlived all three and died heirless in 1347.

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8TH EARL OF SURREY, EARL OF SUSSEX and STRATHERN, SCOTLAND, GOVERNOR OF SCOTLAND: He inherited Surrey and Sussex from his grandfather. John .Was knighted with the Prince of Wales. He married JOAN de BAR, daughter of Henry, Count de Bar, and Eleanor, eldest daughter of King Edward I.

JOHN de WARENNE AND JOAN de BAR HAD NO LEGAL ISSUE.

John took at least two mistresses, MATILDA de NERFORD of Norfolk, and ISABELLA de HOLLAND, daughter of Robert de Holland and Matilda, Earl of Kent. John and his mistresses children were of course illegitimate, so his titles and properties were passed to the son of John's sister Alice and the Earl of Arundel, Richard Fitz-Alan, the 2nd Earl of Arundel. In 1316, he was excommunicated for adultery with Isabel de Houland and Maud de Neirford, there were several children by both liaisons. He later married Isabel. The childen of John and his mistresses were:

John
Thomas

Ravlyn
Sir William
William, prior of Horton, Kent
Joan de Basing
Catherine
Isabella, Cannoness of Sempriogh
Sir Edward


The Last Earl Warenne
John died in 1304 and, since his own son William had been killed at a tournament in Guildford in 1286, he was succeeded by his eighteen-year-old grandson John. A marriage was arranged for him to Joan de Barr, granddaughter of King Edward I. This was not a happy marriage and there were no children; John was thus the eighth and last Earl Warenne. By 1313 Earl John was separated from his wife. Then began a series of efforts to obtain a divorce which were repeatedly unsuccessful. At last it seemed in 1316 that the divorce would be allowed, but once again judgement went against Earl John and, rightly or wrongly, he held Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, responsible for the failure of his case. Intending insult rather than romance, therefore, Earl John abducted Lancaster's wife Alice. Lancaster retaliated by promptly divorcing her and seizing the Warenne castles of Sandal and Conisbrough from his seat at Pontefract in November 1317. At this point King Edward II intervened and an uneasy a!
greement was reached, under which Earl Thomas retained the Yorkshire castles.

Lancaster did not hold Conisbrough for long , for in 1322 he led a rebellion against the King which ended with the battle of Boroughbridge. Thomas was captured and tried for treason, found guilty then executed outside the walls of his own castle at Pontefract. Subsequently Conisbrough was then held by Edward II until 1326, the king stayed briefly at Conisbrough in November 1322, in 1324 he ordered the expenditure of up to 40 marks on repairing the towers and walls of the castles at Pontefract and Conisbrough.

The castle was delivered back to John de Warenne in 1326. He seems to have regained security of tenure during the early years of the reign of Edward III, and certainly by 1331-32. Though unable to divorce his wife, John had two sons by Maud de Nerford who had been the wife of Sir Simon de Derby. By a conveyance ratified by the king, John attempted to secure the tenure of the manor and castle of Conisbrough for his two sons and for Maud after his death; but the careful plan went awry, for John outlived all three and died heirless in 1347.
John de Warenne, 8th Earl of Warren & Sussex, inherited from his grandfather. Aceded in 1304.
The last Earl of Warren and Surrey was the aforementioned John de Warenne, grandson of the seventh Earl. He had been brought up by this grandfather and so had strongly developed military bent. When Edward I married him to his granddaughter Joan there could hardly be a greater mesalliance. The two were quite incompatible and parted after only three years; John de Warenne to go gratefully off to the wars in Scotland. Edward I died shortly after and was succeeded by his son, Edward II . De Warenne accompanied the King to France for his espousals and, when war was resumed with Scotland, returned to do battle once more.
His marriage to Joan nee de Barr was a disaster. However, they did have a son, Edward, who predeceased him. Unfortunately this child did nothing for his marriage. Instead, John lived with a noblewoman, Maud de Nereford, by whom, over the years , he had six children, three of them males, who used the surname of de Warren. There are two petitions made by Edward the King on behalf of these illegitimate children, to the Pope:
"The King to the Venerable in Christ: whereas our cousin John, Earl of Warenne, had two natural sons, our cousins Masters John and William de Warenne, begotten by him on a noblewoman, not married, the King asks for support of his application to th e Pope on their behalf."
And again:
"Edward to the Most Holy in Christ, lauds John, Earl of Warren, whose lawful son and heir is dead, and asks benefices for the two illegitimate sons."
However, since two of these illegitimate sons were ecclesiastics, they were celibate. It is highly unlikely that they would have permitted any of their illegitimate children (if any) to use the de Warenne name.
About the third son, Thomas, nothing is known. Watson assumes that he predeceased his father, since all the other children were cared for in John's will of 1304.
De Warenne, the eighth Earl, had troubles on a larger canvas: He had been steadfast in his loyalty and allegiance to Edward II, but had sided with those who worked to banish Piers Gaveston, the King's homosexual partner. However, when Edward rei nstated Gaveston, de Warenne felt forced to abandon the King. An additional complication was that his cousin, Roger Mortimer, who headed the anti-Gaveston group, was also the Queen's lover. De Warenne, with Henry of Pembroke, Robert Clifford an d others, laid siege to the castle of Scarborough, where Gaveston had retreated. The favourite surrendered and was taken to Warwick Castle, where he was beheaded. De Warenne does not seem to be involved in the later, and most gruesome murde r of the King.
The Earl died without legitimate issue and his estates largely went to his sister Alice Fitz-Alan, the wife of the Earl of Arundel despite the fact that there were surviving children of the marriage of the seventh Earl of Surrey to Joan de Mowbray . The eldest son of that marriage, John, died without issue. Of the second son, Robert, records are silent but the third son, Edward, married in Ireland.
His title to the earldom was never claimed. The estates went to his sister Alice who was married to Edmund Fitz-Alan, Earl of Arundel and they merged into those estates.

Sir Edward de Warenne (born ca. 1316/23, d. c. 1367/8),
reputedlly the ancestor of the Warren family of Poynton, Cheshire. I
studied the matter this past week and found conclusive evidence which
resolved the matter.

The available sources show that John de Warenne, 8th Earl of Surrey
(died 1347) had a mistress, Maud de Nerford, by whom he had several
illegitimate children, including sons, John and Thomas. In his will
dated 1347, he specifically names a son, Edward, who people have
claimed was the ancestor of the Warren family of Poynton.

That Edward is indeed the son of John, 8th Earl and Maud de Nerford,
as well as the ancestor of the Poynton family is proved by several
records. In 1323, Blomefield reports that Sir Ralph de Skeyton
conveyed the reversion of the manors of Booton and Skeyton, Norfolk to
Maud de Nerford and her sons, Ralph and Edward. Maud subsequently
received a release from Sir Ralph de Skeyton's sister and heir, Alice
Hauteyn, in 1345. Maud died soon afterwards as she was reported to be
deceased later that year. At this point, the manors of Booton and
Skeyton, Norfolk fell to her son, Edward de Warenne, in accordance
with the settlement of 1323. The same year, Edward's father, the
Earl, wrote to the Chancellor saying that Edward, then a knight, was
ready to go abroad with the king and requested that Edward holding
lands in Norfolk be released for a demand for furnishing a
man-at-arms. Edward continued to hold Booton and Skeyton and they
subsequently were held by his male heirs, the Warren family of
Poynton. Edward was still living in 1365, but presumably died in or
about 1367/8, when his younger sons, William and Edward, released all
their right in the manor of Booton. Edward married Cecily de Eton,
the daughter of Nicholas de Eton, of Rotley, co. Warwick, by Joan,
daughter and heiress of Robert de Stockport, of Poynton, Cheshire.
The Warren arms (with a canton for Nerford) quartered with the arms of
Eton and Stockport were formerly found in the church window at Booton,
Norfolk. On the death of an Eton cousin about 1370, Edward and
Cecily's son, John, became heir to the Eton and Stockport estates,
including Poynton, Cheshire. The Warenne (or Warren) family was
thereafter seated at Poynton.
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That is mostly right. He was an only son. Alice his sister the only daughter. Their father killed in tournament before he became earl. He tried to get a divorce on nearness of kin. When he ditched Nerford she received his North? Riding Estate //?-a lot.

When he took Lancasters wife –Lancaster took some of his castles. The King later returned most of them to him for life. Before he died he got permission to give of his property himself but the king got most of the estate.

National. Biographies Dictionary of Oxford says he never divorced. Joan lived in Tower under 3 kings & returned to France after his death.

Fitzalan could not claim title until after her death. Fitzalan still got great wealth.. Edmund Lancgley kin’s son was living in Johns castle shortly after death.
He was the last Earl. His was the wealthiest family ever in England.
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Divorce granted 5-21-1315 Dict. Natl. Biographies says he never divorced. Joan de Bar



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