WELLS-PA-L Archives

Archiver > WELLS-PA > 2012-02 > 1328277219


From: Norma Wells <>
Subject: Re: [WELLS-PA] John Wells from Chester County, PA
Date: Fri, 03 Feb 2012 08:53:39 -0500
References: <1327800288.22196.YahooMailNeo@web114706.mail.gq1.yahoo.com> <1327800976.1396.YahooMailNeo@web114704.mail.gq1.yahoo.com> <50278CD1-2C0B-42D4-885D-23CB52305024@socal.rr.com> <1328189869.68284.YahooMailNeo@web114707.mail.gq1.yahoo.com><D20F9988-5DE3-42B2-A9A0-1539E8705EC8@socal.rr.com>
In-Reply-To: <D20F9988-5DE3-42B2-A9A0-1539E8705EC8@socal.rr.com>


Hi Mary Belle, a long time no talk. When Margaret passed away it was
devastating we lost a great generous researcher. Is This John Wells
connected to our Wells here in Leicester, NC such as James Wells Sn b
abt 1720? married a Mary Price and Johnathan (John) Wells being one of
his sons born abt 1764? married Elizabeth Edwards also a brother Newman
Wells and Thomas wells all born in the late 1700's. appreciate your
time. Warm regards Norma Wells related to Rankin J Wells, Joseph
Wells and Kenneth Wells, Robert Pinkney Wells 1798. Thank You

Mary Belle Wells wrote:
> Dear Jan:, Here is the answer to your query:
> Reply-To: Jan Swart <>
>
> Hi MaryBelle Wells,
>
> This is Baker researcher Jan Swart and I saw your Wells family postings on Rootsweb. I am curious if you know if you had a John Wells in Chester County, PA in the 1720s and if we are talking about the same John Wells? I have received paperwork from Chester County, Pa that my ancestor Caleb Baker Sr., who lived near Pequa Creek in Conestoga township in Chester County, PA had an indentured servant named John W. Wells. The case I saw was regarding a horse he had stolen.
>
> In April of 1725, John Wells stole a horse from a landowner named Christopher Franciscus in Chester County, PA and I saw the account charges of John Jones (a Constable who went after and secured John Wells) for the amount of five pounds and one shilling. The charges included "six days expenses for himself and two horses." Or, "three bushells of oats" etc.
>
> Another account was for Christopher Franciscus himself, the person stolen from. Some of his expenses were for " advertisements" and "twelve days of myself and horse at five shillings per day." The note says from the Constable John Jones: "What the law directs for taking up the above servant, which we think the servant's master ought to pay!"
>
> Going on to the May 1725 Indictment series, it shows Caleb Baker as master of this indentured servant. On one page, first sentence it says, "The examination of John W. Wells, late Serv. to Ca. Beakor and left in the service of Maxwell (Manwell?) Heirs."
>
> By another X on another page, it says "John Jones, Constable of Conestoga who is bonded in a Recognize and to present one John Wells, bond for ransom, Caleb Bakor, of the same place being Conestoga, for following and taking of a certain gray shod horse from the said Christopher Franciscus."
>
> You said on Roots web:
>
> "As reported before, John and Isaac Wells appeared in Chester County PA records (research of Margaret Wells.) In Lancaster County Pennsylvania, on 9 Mar. 1743, a John Wells had 100 acres of land on Pequea Creek, surveyed to him and two other men, mortgaged for 45 pounds. [Deed Book B #149.]
>
> On 23 April 1744 John Wells sold 126 acres on Pequea Creek, Salisbury Township, including a water grist mill, to William Fullerton and others [Deed Book B, p. 90, recorded 21Jun 1747, no wife signed, no witnesses.]
>
> On 7 December 1756, in York County PA (formed 1749 from Lancaster County) a John Wells died intestate, and letters of administration were granted to Catherine Wells. [Deed Book A p. 140—the only Wells that period, York or Lancaster counties.] "
>
> Reply: February 2, 2012
>
> Dear Jan,
>
> What an interesting new bit of information! I'm sure we are writing about the same man, because there was only one "John Wells" in that period in the Chester-Lancaster-York area, according to land and probate records in Lancaster and York counties. So it was probably the 1725 "indentured servant" of Chester County, who later owned the water grist mill on Pequea Creek, in Lancaster County (formed from Chester in 1729), mortgaged that land in 1743, sold it the next year, and was the "John Wells" who married in 1743 in Pennsylvania, but no wife, place or church given, and died in York County (formed in 1749 from Lancaster County) in 1756.
>
> That indentured servant was (by DNA of descendants in western North Carolina) of the family of Edmund Wells (1640 ENG-ca 1701 NJ?) and wife Mary ____ who immigrated between March 1684 when they baptized two young sons in Bradfield, Berkshire England, and 1687 when John Wells/Olive Hunt of the same place, who traveled with them and was some close relative, was chosen a Quaker delegate in Philadelphia County, PA. Edmund and Mary's oldest son Henry (1672 ENG-1714 PA) settled in Bucks County, PA and left a will naming nine sons and one daughter.
>
> Henry's third son, John Wells Sr. of Bucks County, PA, became the family black sheep. He was "under 21" in 1714 when his father died, since the will states his two next older brothers were then "over 21 but not yet 25". Since babies are born about every two years without birth control, and they were both "over 21" my guess is they were 23-24 and 21-22 ihen, and third son John therefore about 19 or 20 when his father died, born about 1695.
>
> John apparently married early, because his sons, John II and Isaac Wells of Lancaster County, who loaned him money in1742 to keep him out of debtor's prison, had to be 21 in 1742, adults, to act for him in court, or born by at least 1719 and 1721 respectively. "Black Sheep" John also had a probable son Edward Wells who married in 1738 in what was then Lancaster and later York County without needing the consent of a guardian; if he was not lying about his age, he would have been born by 1717, at his father's probable age of twenty-two. "Black Sheep" John's proven daughter Mary was married by 1742 and was also involved--making the oldest of the four born by at least 1715. That's four children for "Black Sheep" John born by his ages about 20-26.
>
> Despite having inherited 30 pounds at his father's death in 1714, by 1717 "Black Sheep John" began appearing in the Bucks County Court arrested for debt, and he kept that up until he died (estate settlement in December 1749, no widow named.) He was repeatedly bailed out by relatives and was in debt to them when he died. Since he was in Bucks County Court regularly as "John Wells of Bristol, laborer," including in 1725, he could not be the "Indentured servant" of Caleb Baker in Chester County in April 1725, over a hundred miles away. Therefore his son John [W.] Wells of Chester/Lancaster/York counties, who settled his estate, must have been indentured very young, and was probably only eight to ten, when he stole the horse in April 1725.
>
> To finish the story, "indentured servant" John Wells II (or his brother Isaac I) fathered another pair of brothers, John III and Isaac II, born "in Pennsylvania" in 1741 and 1743 respectively, who were in North Carolina in time to fight in the Revolution there. Each then founded families that spread over much of the South and West. Their descendants will be surprised to know of the daring deed of their ancestor, "indentured servant" John W. Wells!
>
> Mary Belle Wells
>
>
>
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