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From: Dani Brown <>
Subject: Ten Free Things To Do On Ancestry.Com
Date: Thu, 13 Oct 2005 13:18:20 -0700 (PDT)


THE INSIDER:
"TEN FREE THINGS TO DO ON ANCESTRY.COM,"
by Anastasia Sutherland Tyler
=====================================================================

Just about everyone loves free things, be it free
food, free concert
tickets, or free samples. So, without further ado,
here are ten things
you can do for free on Ancestry.com.

1. SEARCH TWO CENSUS INDEXES
Ancestry.com offers two census indexes for free
searching: the 1880 U.S.
Federal Census and the 1881 England, Wales, Isle of
Man, and Channel
Islands Census. The 1880 U.S. Federal Census
(http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?sourceid=831&dbid=6742)

is an
every-name index and the last census available census
for the 1800s.

The 1881 census every-name index includes enumerations

for
(http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?sourceid=831&dbid=7572)

England,
(http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?sourceid=831&dbid=8059)

Wales,
(http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?sourceid=831&dbid=8061)

the Isle
of Man, and
(http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?sourceid=831&dbid=8063)

the
Channel Islands.


2. GET SEARCH TIPS FOR SPECIFIC STATES
You can easily find out what's available on
Ancestry.com for each U.S.
state by going to "Search Records" tab
(http://www.ancestry.com/search/),
scrolling down to the U.S. map, and clicking on a
specific state. You'll
be given a list of what you can find on Ancestry.com
for that state, plus
tips for searching for other records in that state.
(Note that accessing
articles for the online versions of "The Source" and
"Red Book" requires
a U.S. Records collection subscription.) For more
information, see my
article "Searching by Location, Location, Location"
(http://www.ancestry.com/rd/prodredir.asp?sourceid=831&key=A1001901).


3. DOWNLOAD THE FTM TRIAL VERSION
You can download and install Family Tree Maker 2005
Starter Edition, a
basic form of the most popular family tree program on
the market
(http://www.familytreemaker.com/download/starter.aspx).

This starter
version gives you full functionality to the program
for fourteen days.
After that you can buy a key code that keeps the full
functionality
unlocked, or, if you don't buy the key code, you can
continue to use the
basic tree editing. You can update to the full feature

set at any time.
Use this starter edition to see if moving to Family
Tree Maker is right
for you, or to begin building your family tree if
you're new to family
history.


4. DOWNLOAD FAMILY HISTORY FORMS AND LOGS
Ancestry.com provides many commonly used family
history charts to help
you extend your family tree. The downloadable charts
are:

Ancestral Chart
http://www.ancestry.com/trees/charts/ancchart.aspx

Family Group Sheet
http://www.ancestry.com/charts/familysheet.aspx

Research Calendar
http://www.ancestry.com/charts/researchcal.aspx

Correspondence Record
http://www.ancestry.com/charts/correcord.aspx

Source Summary
http://www.ancestry.com/charts/sourcesum.aspx

Research Extract
http://www.ancestry.com/charts/researchext.aspx

U.S. Census Forms, 1790-1930
(Plus 1890 veterans schedule and 1850 and 1860 slave
schedule)
http://www.ancestry.com/charts/census.aspx

U.K. Census Forms, 1841-1901
http://www.ancestry.com/charts/ukcensus.aspx


5. ADD MESSAGES TO MESSAGE BOARDS
Message boards are an easy way to connect with
researchers around the
world. Ancestry.com houses message boards that focus
on surnames,
locations, and other topics of interest, such as
adoption and cemeteries.
To access the message boards, click on the "Message
Boards" tab
(http://www.ancestry.com/share/) from the Ancestry.com

home page. Here
you can search the message boards for specific content

or browse the
message board topics. And check out George Morgan's
"Message Board
Postings That Never Get Answered"
(http://www.ancestry.com/rd/prodredir.asp?sourceid=831&key=A974206)

and
learn how to write effective posts on message boards.


6. REGISTER IN THE RESEARCH REGISTRY
The Research Registry is a way for you to connect with

people working on
the same surnames or families as you. Access the
Research Registry
through the Message Boards tab on Ancestry.com
(http://www.ancestry.com/share/). On the right side of

the page you'll
see a box titled Research Registry. From here you can
search for others
working on specific surnames or add your own research
profiles so that
others can find you. Note that if you are not an
Ancestry.com subscriber
or registered site user, you will probably have to
register your name and
e-mail address in to access the Research Registry.
This registration is
free.


7. FIND FACTS ABOUT SURNAMES
Knowing some basic facts about the surnames you are
researching can help
you know when and where to search for ancestors. Enter

Family
Facts--information about surname distribution across
the United States in
the 1840, 1880, and 1920 federal censuses, Civil War
service by surname,
occupations by surname, surname's place of origin,
ports of departure by
surname, and name origins (for both given names and
surnames).
Accompanied these facts are fields of text titled "How

is this helpful?"
and "What do I do next?" that may help you find new
research paths.
Access Family Facts by clicking on the Learning Center

tab, and then
clicking on the link under the "Family Facts" heading,

or by going to:
http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/default.aspx


8. FIND ANSWERS IN THE KNOWLEDGE BASE
The knowledge base is a little-known treasure trove of

information about
Ancestry.com. In it you can search though answers to
many questions asked
by our members or e-mail your question to Ancestry.com

support. Access
the knowledge base by clicking on the "Help"
(http://ancestry.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/ancestry.cfg/php/enduser/std_alp.ph
p)
link in the upper right corner of most pages on
Ancestry.com.


9. FIND ARTICLES IN THE LIBRARY
You read the "Ancestry Daily News" every day. You
might even print it out
and save it in your reference binder. But did you know

that each
"Ancestry Daily News," each featured article, and each

quick tip is
archived in the Library on Ancestry.com? Did you also
know that articles
(minus graphics) from past issues of "Ancestry"
Magazine and
"Genealogical Computing" are posted in the Library as
well?

To access these articles, click on the Learning Center

tab
(http://www.ancestry.com/learn/). Use the "Search the
Library" box to
find articles on a specific subject or by your
favorite author (my name
is spelled A-n-a-s-t. . .--just kidding!).


10. LEARN MORE IN THE LEARNING CENTERS
Ancestry.com houses ten Learning Centers--areas on the

website where you
can learn about various family history topics. Each
learning center
focuses on a family history concept or an Ancestry.com

record collection,
including census, vital, immigration, and military
records. These
topic-focused areas allow you to easily basic
information on each topic,
search tips both on and offline, success stories from
other researchers,
and much more.

Access Learning Centers by clicking the "Learning
Center" tab
(http://www.ancestry.com/learn/) from the Ancestry.com

home page. Then
click on one of the titles listed under "Learn More
About" on the right
side of the page. To learn more about these Learning
Centers, read "Viva
Learning Centers."
(http://www.ancestry.com/rd/prodredir.asp?sourceid=831&key=A1021601)




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